Chicago Channel

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Chicago City in Illinois

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Description

Chicago, on Lake Michigan in Illinois, is among the largest cities in the U.S. Famed for its bold architecture, it has a skyline punctuated by skyscrapers such as the iconic John Hancock Center, 1,451-ft. Willis Tower (formerly the Sears Tower) and the neo-Gothic Tribune Tower. The city is also renowned for its museums, including the Art Institute of Chicago with its noted Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works.

Weather: 53°F (12°C), Wind SE at 13 mph (21 km/h), 75% Humidity

Local time: Saturday 9:16 AM

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Chicago travel guide

Did you know: Chicago is the third-largest United States city by population (2,705,994). wikipedia.org

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  • Chicago rapper KC Ortiz brings buckle-your-seat-belts fun to The Campground
    by Leor Galil on September 24, 2020 at 1:00 pm

    Rapper KC Ortiz grew up in Mobile, Alabama, and fell in love with Chicago after her drag mother showed her a video of local female-impersonation pageant Miss Continental. As she told Windy City Times last year, “I hadn’t transitioned at that time and didn’t know that world existed.…

  • Resurrection Band opened the gates for Christian hard rock
    by Steve Krakow on September 24, 2020 at 11:00 am

    The hard-rocking Resurrection Band arose from the Jesus movement in the early 70s and went on to help the modern Christian music industry break into MTV. Since 2004 Plastic Crimewave (aka Steve Krakow) has used the Secret History of Chicago Music to shine a light on worthy artists with Chicago ties who’ve been forgotten, underrated, or never noticed in the first place.…

  • Annihilus uses black metal’s powers for good
    by Noah Berlatsky on September 23, 2020 at 11:55 pm

    Inspired by comic books and science fiction, the new Annihilus album Ghanima proves that negative emotions can draw people together, not just drive wedges between them. Black metal is infamous for the unpleasantness of its message and its practitioners.…

  • Chinese guitarist Li Jianhong takes spiritual psychedelic noise to Europe
    by Noah Berlatsky on September 23, 2020 at 1:00 pm

    Guitarist Li Jianhong is fairly unknown in the U.S., but he’s one of the most important experimental musicians in China. Like Sonic Youth and Japanese rock collective Ghost, he straddles and/or blasts his way across the line between psychedelic rock and exploratory noise; he also frequently incorporates a spiritual component inspired by Buddhism and traditional Chinese art.…

  • Sirr TMo Sama gives footwork a strange peacefulness with On Dat
    by Leor Galil on September 22, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    In June, the label arm of the Chicago-born Teklife footwork collective released its first flexi disc, “Juke Me Baby” by Reginald Cosper Jr., aka Sirr TMo Sama. Cosper builds the track on an ascending, bone-dry percussive pattern, weaving in a few different vocal samples and several drum loops; he never lets up on the gas, which gives the song’s ever-shifting, palpitating drive enough energy to power a midsize city.…

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  • Alderman claims mayor stalling on new community policing program in Roseland
    by Manny Ramos on September 24, 2020 at 9:04 pm

    Ald. Anthony Beale (9th) (left center) has worked to open a Community Oriented Policing House in Roseland for over a year and a half, and believes the mayor is stopping it from happening. | Sun-Times File A Community Oriented Policing House, a proposal for developing a residential home in Roseland to double as a base for officers and residents, has failed to get off the ground for over a year now despite the private funding. A new community policing initiative in the Roseland neighborhood has been in limbo for over a year, and the local alderman says Mayor Lori Lightfoot is playing politics with the project. Ald. Anthony Beale (9th) said top cops are all on board with the pilot program but he’s been told he can’t move forward without a green light from Mayor Lori Lightfoot. “I’ve been working on this for almost two years with the mayor’s office and I can’t get anywhere,” Beale said. “It isn’t being approved because it’s all political and it’s me, my idea. I think it’s personal.” Beale said a couple large corporations in his ward have worked with him to bring a Community Oriented Policing House to the area. The companies would pay to buy, renovate and furnish the home. Beale can’t identify the companies yet. The mayor’s office rejects Beale’s assertion it is holding up the COP House. Under the proposal, the home would double as a base for police officers and a community center where residents could access social services. A house was under contract when the proposal was first made, but that deal fell through during the long wait for approval. Just this year, Beale said, five shootings and three deaths occurred on the block where that property is located, though he wouldn’t say where that is. Beale doesn’t believe the Chicago Police Department is to blame for the delay. He said he has met with the 5th District commander, former police Supt. Eddie Johnson, former interim Supt. Charlie Beck and police Supt. David Brown. All three liked it, but he was told nothing could be done without Lightfoot’s approval. A CPD spokeswoman couldn’t comment, because the proposal remains under review. As for Lightfoot, a mayoral spokesman replied: “As stated previously to the alderman, this proposal is not a mayor’s office decision but one for the Chicago Police Department, which is why the Department is currently reviewing the proposal.” Beale, among the mayor’s more vocal critics, claims Lightfoot is stonewalling the COP House. Beale said the COP House was inspired by an effort in Racine, Wis. That city’s police department launched it in 1996; there now are six houses, which have reduced crime by as much as 70% in some areas. Nearby cities like Rockford and Elgin have taken it a step further, recruiting officers to live temporarily in troubled neighborhoods rent-free. “Right now the city doesn’t have a plan and we are here presenting an innovative idea that will cost the taxpayer no money but no one is taking it seriously,” Beale said. “The city has no other plan than throwing more overtime at the crime problem, which is just creating more problems and hasn’t worked.” Chicago was one of the first U.S. cities to implement community policing — CAPS. the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy, started in 1993. In 2004, The American Prospect reported CAPS might be the “nation’s best hope for reforming law enforcement policy.” Many criminal justice experts believe it bridges the divide between police and residents, though money for the program began shrinking over time. At its peak in 1999, CAPS budget was $12.5 million. By this year, it had was down to $5 million. The CAPS office inside the 5th District staton would be moved to the COP House. Certain officers will spend time on the block getting to know the community, helping residents repair their homes or taking part in neighborhood clean-up events. Once crime subsides, Beale said, they could sell the newly renovated house to a low-income family, then open a new one. “I want kids to grow up and not see the police as adversarial. I want our kids to see them as friends and people they can rely on,” Beale said. “This is a huge starting point.” Sharon Fairley, head of the former Independent Police Review Authority, said community policing is vital for improving the perception of police. She said the COP House has shown “success in other places and should be considered and tried here in Chicago.” “The one concern here in Chicago with having a COP House is that many neighborhoods already feel as if they are over-policed and there are concerns that having additional police in the area may feel oppressive,” Fairley said. “So it is important to get the community involved and ask how this can be an effective tool.” Diane Latiker runs Kids Off the Block, a Roseland-based nonprofit focused on youth violence prevention. She welcomes anything that helps build trust with the police. “To me, police only arrive when there is an issue or during a traumatic event,” Latiker said. “It would go a long way if [police] were actually in the community actively getting to know residents.” Manny Ramos is a corps member in Report for America, a not-for-profit journalism program that aims to bolster Sun-Times coverage of issues affecting Chicago’s South and West sides.

  • New Aaron Sorkin Netflix film ‘The Trial of the Chicago 7’ — and original Sun-Times reporting from the trial
    by Sun-Times on September 24, 2020 at 9:02 pm

    Chicago Seven activist Jerry Rubin puts on a wig during a press conference for the conspiracy trail in Chicago, Oct. 17, 1969. | Bob Kotalik/Chicago Sun-Times The trial of the Chicago 7 dominated headlines locally and nationally 1969 when eight (later seven) men were charged with conspiring to incite violence and crossing state lines in connection with the violence during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. In 1969, no other trial garnered more coverage in local newspapers than that of the infamous “Chicago Seven.” Every twist and turn in the courtroom guaranteed front-page story. Now, it’s getting the big-screen treatment. “The Trial of the Chicago 7,” the latest Netflix film by Aaron Sorkin, hits theaters Sept. 24 for a limited run before landing on the streaming service on Oct. 16. The film, starring Eddie Redmayne, Sacha Baron Cohen, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II and Frank Langella, dramatizes the events of the trial — but the original, real-time reporting from the Chicago Daily News and Chicago Sun-Times captured all of the emotions in black and white as the story unfolded. The trial centered around the eight (later seven) defendants — Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Tom Hayden, Bobby Seale, David Dellinger, Rennie Davis, John Froines and Lee Weiner— who were accused of conspiring to incite a riot and crossing state lines to do so during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. During the five nights of the convention, protests turned violent when demonstrators, including the defendants, clashed with Chicago police, who used billy clubs and tear gas to try enforce the city’s curfew. People protested for a number of reasons, but most came to demonstrate opposition to the Vietnam War, which at the time was in its 13th year. The trial began on Sept. 24, 1969 and concluded on Feb. 18, 1970. Throughout the trial, U.S. District Judge Julius Hoffman showed contempt for the defendants, remarking on Abbie Hoffman’s (no relation) long hair and denying defense motions, while allowing nearly all motions from the prosecutors. The defendants, however, did not sit idly by. They stirred up drama themselves, dressing in wigs, blowing kisses at the crowd and calling Judge Hoffman a “fascist dog” and “racist” in the press. All seven were found guilty of contempt of court, and five were found guilty of crossing state lines with intent to incite a riot. None were found guilty of the conspiracy charges. All received prison sentences for contempt of court, including one of the defendants’ lawyers, and five also received a $5,000 fine. Bobby Seale, the Black Panther chairman who was given his own trial, was found guilty of contempt of court and sentenced to four years in prison. In 1972, the Chicago Seven won appeals for their contempt and criminal charges. Seale was the only one who did not win an appeal for his contempt of court charge.

  • Eying TDs, Bears’ Eddie Jackson ‘won’t just settle’ for an interception
    by Patrick Finley on September 24, 2020 at 8:36 pm

    Bears safety Eddie Jackson intercepts a pass Sunday, only for a penalty to nullify the call. | Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images “There’s 100 guys that get interceptions around the league,” Jackson said, “but there are very few scoring a touchdown when they get the ball.” Before Eddie Jackson offered to help his teammate up, he told him he should have gone to his left. When Deon Bush intercepted the Giants’ Daniel Jones at the left hash early in the second quarter Sunday, he ran toward the middle of the field before eventually — and unsuccessfully — trying to bounce it outside. He was tackled for a gain of 10 yards — by an offensive lineman. Jackson, a fellow Bears safety, ran to help him up, but not before gesturing that he should have run outside the minute he recorded his first career interception. Defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano even joked that Bush would be fined for not pitching the ball to Jackson or cornerback Kyle Fuller, who were sprinting up the left flank like rugby teammates when Bush was tackled. “I feel like everyone knows that when I get the ball, I think touchdown,” Jackson said. ‘So I feel like that’s the standard I want to hold the rest of our defense to, especially the DBs, let’s not just settle with getting an interception.” Jackson, though, hasn’t had a touchdown since Nov. 22, 2018. In the first 25 games of his career, Jackson returned three interceptions and two fumbles for touchdowns. In his 21 since, he has zero scores. His attitude, though, has never wavered. “There’s 100 guys that get interceptions around the league,” Jackson said, “but there are very few scoring a touchdown when they get the ball.” In the fourth quarter Sunday, though, he reminded the NFL that he’s one of those rare players. He intercepted a pass — after popping the ball up himself — and returned it for a 54-yard touchdown, only for line judge Perry Paganelli to throw a late flag ruling that he’d bumped tight end Kaden Smith before the ball arrived. Jackson said Thursday that Pagnelli apologized to him, saying he thought Smith popped the ball up, and apologized. “My bad,” Jackson said the official told him. “I was like, ‘My bad?’ Like, ‘what?’ So he just walked off. But you know it’s tough for those guys, trying to make a call and not see if it’s pass interference or not in the blink of an eye.” It was a gorgeous play — until the flag came out. Jackson caught his own tip at the Bears’ 47 and then ran up for the left sideline. At the Giants’ 22, he cut inside to elude three tacklers that were in front of him. He sprinted around running back Dion Lewis, scoring on the far right side of the field — the O in the word “Chicago” painted in the end zone. Jackson was frustrated, but admits he has a rather zen approach to touchdowns being overturned. Another one is coming, he believes. “You always get them back,” he said. “That’s the good thing about it.” The Bears practice it. During interception drills, defenders are taught to run toward the sideline when they get the ball. The players in front of them block. The ones behind them clap for the ball — the way Jackson and Fuller did — and hope for a lateral. “We’re really close with the turnover stuff,” Pagano said. “They’re making them in practice. You see it on Wednesday, you see it on Thursday, you see it on Friday. Usually when that happens during the week, it’s going to happen on Sundays. We got to keep that going.” Jackson had it Sunday — before the late flag came out. “That’s something he’s been doing his whole career, man — picking it off and taking it back … ” receiver Cordarrelle Patterson said. “He sees the end zone, he scores in the end zone.”

  • A trip down memory lane for closing bar that once housed speakeasy, brothel
    by Stefano Esposito on September 24, 2020 at 8:36 pm

    Owner Steve Soble plans to close Southport Lanes on Sunday. | Anthony Vazquez/Sun-Times Last call at Southport Lanes is Sunday. “It’s been one of the strangest six months of our lives,” owner Steve Soble said. In the Roaring Twenties, a mural behind the bar of frolicking garden nymphs quietly hinted at the illicit pleasures to be had just up the staircase. The mural is still there at Southport Lanes in Lake View, albeit much dimmed from decades of tobacco smoke. The old hand-cranked dumbwaiter remains too — at one time used to shuttle cocktails to the prostitutes and their customers one floor above. Linda Beitz learned to dance in the bar in the 1960s, when her parents, Leo and Ella, owned it. Her father would shove a quarter in the jukebox and then grab Ella or a customer for the jitterbug or the cha-cha. “My dad was a fabulous dancer,” said Beitz this week. There’s been a lot of reminiscing of late, now that Steve Soble, Southport Lanes’ owner since 1991, has decided to close. “It’s been one of the strangest six months of our lives,” said Soble, 56, echoing the refrain of many a bar owner in the city. He’s had “virtually no one” inside the 6,250-square-foot bar during the pandemic. Even with 50 or so seats outside, he had to pray for good weather. “When it rained, it was not even worth opening,” he said. And so on Sunday the bartender will holler “last call!” one more time. The pins in the adjoining four-lane bowling alley clattered for the last time in mid-March after the statewide shutdown. Soble, then 27, bought the bar from the Beitzes in the early 1990s. Today, posh boutiques, restaurants and coffee shops line the Southport corridor surrounding the bar. When Soble moved to the neighborhood, warring gang factions regularly exchanged gunfire across the thoroughfare. Soble said he once interrupted a murder attempt. As he led a visitor on a recent tour of the place, Soble stopped to point out the honeycomb-like rack for bowling shoes that hides the first-floor door to the the dumbwaiter, as well as the fancy tin ceiling he had installed when he converted the old beer hall into the a billiards room. He pointed to where Chicago Mayor Anton Cermak would come in the 1930s to play poker in a tiny, secret room that no longer exists. And he recalled the time in the early 1990s when a short, middle-aged guy came up to him to put his name on the waiting list to bowl. “I said, ‘Hey, you look familiar.’ He said, ‘I’m Al Pacino.’ I said, ‘We don’t serve cappuccino here.’” After an embarrassed Soble realized he’d misheard and not recognized one of his all-time favorite actors, who was in town filming “Glengarry Glen Ross,” he said: “Nice to meet you. What size shoes do you wear?” The Cubs came here, too, in 2004, when pitcher Kerry Wood threw a surprise party for teammate Ryan Dempster. Families have gathered for baptism and wedding parties. “Maybe someone will come in and do something great with it,” Soble said, sounding just a little wistful. Soble said he’s not yet had any serious offers for the place. When he first met the previous owners of the bar almost 30 years ago, Soble drank a shot of peach schnapps or Crown Royal with the couple — he doesn’t recall which one now. So on Sunday, he’ll knock back a shot, maybe two. “That would be the most appropriate way to make last call and shut the lights off,” he said.

  • Breonna Taylor update: Bears react to ‘crazy’ decision on charges against Louisville police
    by Jason Lieser on September 24, 2020 at 8:23 pm

    David Montgomery, the Bears’ starting running back, has been vocal amid the team’s conversations about racial injustice. | For the Sun-Times Bears running backs David Montgomery and Cordarrelle Patterson delivered raw statements on what they saw as a total lack of justice for Taylor after her death at the hands of police officers. The ongoing unrest over racial injustice in America has been inextricably woven into the Bears’ season, and some players have kept it at the forefront at Halas Hall rather than use football as an escape. As they got ready for practice Thursday afternoon, running backs David Montgomery and Cordarrelle Patterson reeled from the announcement that no one was charged in the shooting death of Black woman Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Ky. She was killed when police stormed her apartment in March, and the only charges were three counts of wanton endangerment by one officer. It reiterated to Montgomery and Patterson it’s unsafe to be Black and there’s no guarantee of fair legal treatment. “Being scared to be who I am just because of the color of my skin and… fearing if I was to get pulled over by a cop or if anything were to happen to me, I wouldn’t know if it’d be the last breath that I’d be taking,” Montgomery said. “It’s scary. We’ve just got to keep fighting and challenging those who need to be challenged so that we can get it fixed and changed.” The Bears have engaged racial topics throughout the last few years and established a player-led social justice committee. Coach Matt Nagy shut down meetings in May to have a team discussion about the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer, and players boycotted a practice last month after police shot Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wis. Multiple players said they anticipated having a team meeting about the Taylor decision. Taylor’s death was ruled a homicide, but none of the three officers who fired their guns were charged with killing her. John Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove face no charges, and Brett Hankison’s three charges are the lowest level felonies in Kentucky and carries a sentence of 1-5 years per charge. The City of Louisville settled a wrongful death suit by Taylor’s mother for $12 million two weeks ago. The announcement of charges prompted protests in Louisville and throughout the country, including in Chicago. Two officers were shot during demonstrations in Louisville on Wednesday night. Patterson brought up the Taylor decision before the media asked a single question, saying he thought the minor charges were “crazy” and were difficult to explain to his children. “You never know how safe you are,” Patterson said. “We’re not untouchable — that’s what we have to understand. It happens to everybody in this world, no matter if you’re a pro athlete or not. It happens to everybody. Athletes, we’ve just gotta keep using our voice. “It’s a hurtful thing. It’s sad what her family had to go through. We seen they gave them money, millions of dollars — that [stuff], it won’t bring her back. I don’t care anything about money; I just want my life and my family with me. I would never want to go through an experience like that.” As heavily as it weighed on Patterson, he still has hope. “I just have to keep educating my kids and keep preaching to them that it’s going to get better,” he said. “Because I do feel like it’s going to get better. “I just look to the people who are trying to help us. And the people who ain’t, just stay [far] away. Because 2020 has already been a terrible year for everybody — people losing their jobs, everything. There is so much going on on top of this police stuff. So we’re trying to do better in 2020, and hopefully 2021 brings us great love and peace.”

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